our blog

0

Sharing this beautiful story by our good friend, Rachel Roberge, about her incredible son.

Although her story may be unique - we think every parent can relate to and benefit from Rachel's meaningful words. A very worthwhile read. - Allison and Alison

When Our Doctor Said, ‘We’re Pretty Sure Your Baby Is Missing His Right Hand’
(from themighty.com)
by Rachel Roberge

“We’re pretty sure your baby is missing his right hand.”

If I could go back to the day my son got this diagnosis, what would I tell myself?

…Breathe.

You’re allowed to cry. You’re going to cry a lot… for a while. You’re going to wake up in the middle of the night to cry only to find that your husband is also awake. He’ll be crying too.

You’re about to go through many tests. Find the best geneticist. Find the best fetal cardiologist. Write down every question you have. If you think the question may sound crazy, ask it anyway. Get answers and write those down too. After all the tests are complete, they’re going to tell you everything looks good. It seems to be just his hand, but you’re going to be afraid they might be wrong. You won’t feel quite sure until he’s born.

You’re going to have a lot of sonograms. If they’re so sure it’s just his hand, why all the sonograms? You’ll feel uncertain and scared, so get support. You’re now part of the “limb difference” community. Check out the Lucky Fin Project,Born Just Right and Living One-Handed among other great resources.

You’re going to spend your 40th birthday in the hospital because there will be other pregnancy complications. It will be six weeks until your due date but guess what? Surprise! You’re going to have your baby boy.

They were right. It is just his hand. He’s beautiful. The best birthday present you will ever have. And to think you spent all that time worrying. He’s perfect. Perfectly imperfect. Aren’t we all?

When you bring your son home from the hospital your daughter will be almost 3. She’s not even going to notice his missing hand at first, even though you tried to explain it to her in advance. When she does notice, it’s going to be a non-issue. She’s going to be crazy in love with him, and he’ll be crazy in love with her.

When your little boy becomes a toddler, he’ll already amaze you with all hecan do. Watch out, he’s going to be a climber. You’re going to have to take the handles off the lower kitchen cabinets because he’s going to climb on the counter when you turn your back for five seconds. When you take him to the park he’s going to climb on everything and love it. He’s going to play with all the kids and pretty much all the kids are going to ask about his hand. Most will accept it when you tell them he was born like that. Some will be afraid and run away. He’ll be too little to notice but it’s going to sting you… and you’ll tear up when he runs away, blissfully unaware, to climb and play some more.

When your boy is 3 and a half, you’re going to be tucking him in one night and he’s going to start softly crying, his little lips will be turned downward, heavy with sadness. He’s going to tell you he doesn’t want his special hand anymore. He wants his fingers to grow, and he’s pretty sure “they really, really will grow, Mom.” His fingers aren’t going to grow, but you’re not going to have the heart to tell him in that moment. You’re going to tell him you love him the way he is. Aside from that, what can you do but hold him close and let him express everything he’s feeling? When he finally falls asleep your tears will fall. You’ll realize this is one of many things to come that you can’t fix for your child.

When he’s 4, your beautiful little boy will tie his shoes by himself — with one hand no less. You’ll realize that this simple act will inspire you and others. The pride, the joy, the loving and knowing he’s yours will be remarkable. Even at a young age, if he can find a way to do something, he will, and he’ll practice until his goal is realized. It’s almost as if something deep within is driving him further.

Your son is going to love basketball. Even at just 5 years old, he’s going to become good at it. Shockingly good. He’s going to want to play every day — any free moment he can. He’s going to become best buds and kindred spirits with a college student named Kevin Laue. Kevin is the first person partially missing his left arm ever to be recruited with a full scholarship to a NCAA Division 1 basketball team. Not unlike Kevin, your little boy will have seemingly unstoppable determination.

Jackson_Jordan Classic_photo by Ned Dishman_04.2013
Photo by Ned Dishman
So breathe. It’s going to be OK. It’s going to be better than OK.

This is the beautifully messy, imperfectly perfect life you’ve been given, and you won’t want to trade it for anything.

0

NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTION

Our friends at Do What You Love For Life created an incredible tool for making 2015 the best it can be.  Check out what the Do What You Love For Life team has to say below and download the "New Year’s Revolution: A practical kit to help you make 2015 the year you do what you love" :




0

Every week in our Big Interview we celebrate people who have dreams, drive and passion. And one lady who has all three in abundance is the amazing Alison Qualter Berna. Alison is a mum, a businesswoman and an adventurer who thrives on helping to bring out the best in others. She loves a challenge and recently guided the first blind runner across the Grand Canyon. She can also do a headstand on a paddle board and we think that’s pretty awesome! If ever you needed inspiration to get out there, do what you love and live life to the max, this is it… – Rachel Kempton (dowhatyouloveforlife.com)


Read the full interview here!

0

A Mother’s Story Told by Daughters

by Wendy Bradford

My girls, who are five and seven, found two little books in a bookcase that I was to fill out at some point. The books are similar, each is called A Mother’s Story, and they are meant to be keepsake journals, records from one generation to the next.

Being a procrastinator, a recorder on blogs and social media now more than in journals, I’ve left those little books alone. But the girls were happy to fill in the answers themselves, and as I went through the books with their unfinished statements, clearly meant to record and save a mother’s childhood and personal thoughts for her daughter(s), I laughed and was a little surprised at the places we intersect.

(I didn’t help them with these; I suspect they did them together as only one girl knows how to read well. I have corrected the spelling to spare you the hours of effort.)

Mother: Wendy
Daughter: Ellie

My favorite outfit to wear was….
My mommy bought me a stuffed bunny and she bought me a yoga mat.

My favorite subject in school was…
Art is the best.

My very best friend was…
Santa got me a Stuff Stuffy.

The person I looked up to the most was…
Luna. [Luna is a kindergartner.]

My first job was…
My babysitter bought a toy for me.

The most important lesson I ever learned was…
I love my mom.

The best advice anyone ever gave me…
You can’t say the word Die

Some of my goals were…
Ballet.

When you were a child, a typical day was…
When my kids hit me. [That is not a typical day.]

You made me laugh when…
When I did silly dances.

You surprise me most when…
When you wear a wig.

You remind me of myself when…
I was a baby.
___

Mother: Wendy
Daughter: Molly

My earliest childhood memory is….
My sister. She was a baby. She was sitting on my lap.

The happiest time in my childhood was…
When we went to Disney World.

As a child, people would describe me as…
A beautiful girl and sunshine sun.

When I was growing up, I wanted to become a…
Police woman because so I can help the world not get hurt and in trouble.

My most mischievous moment was…
When I was born.

When I was little, I liked to spend time…
With my family.

My favorite outfit to wear was…
A shirt and shorts or leggings or jeans or pants.

My favorite subject in school was…
Art and computer and music and library and Spanish.

The person I looked up to the most was…
Caroline. [Caroline is a second grader.]

My first job was…
Table cleaner.

The most important lesson I ever learned was…
Math.

The best advice anyone ever gave me…
You should always look both sides.

Some of my goals were…
Do a good job.

What I consider romantic…
Always make friends. [She asked me what “romantic” meant. I told her it meant what you like to do.]

How our family began…
I was born in my mommy’s tummy then my brother came along then my sister came along that is why my brother is a little bigger than my sister.

When I saw you for the first time…
I was so happy and surprised.

As a new mom, my biggest fear was…
Take care of my children.

After you were born, my life changed in lots of ways like…
Getting older.

When you were a child, a typical day was…
Getting born.

You remind me of myself when…
I was a baby.

The best advice to share about being a mother is…
Rules.

Inside my handbag, you’ll always find…
My life.

A family recipe I cherish…
We have Thanksgiving.

My idea of a perfect day is…
Thanksgiving.

A pet peeve of mine is…
Cat.

My wish for you in life…
Because I have someone to love.

0

How Playing An Instrument Benefits Your Brain

We wanted to share this short animated video we like by TED-Ed. It is about how playing an instrument benefits your brain. It’s food for thought for your growing babies, and more about the importance of music…


Come and join us in songs for seeds class and they will already be able to start touching and playing the guitar, piano, drums and more!